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Ironic Contradictions

I'm a long time reader - since way back when I was seven. That makes it over three quarters of my life that I will be a reader for. But it is worth it. When I'm not reading or wasting my time online on here or Goodreads I'll be off playing video games, studying teaching and messing around with friends and pop culture. Or reading some more.
Finding God in the Hobbit - Jim Ware, Kurt Bruner I picked this up once from my school library and now that I'm rereading The Hobbit I thought I might as well give this a brief review.

Now I'm one of those people who loves to learn. In many ways I'm a scholar because I'll read a book simply to make my own judgements about it and also because I'm interested in the subject matter. I may then also go and find further resources at times for some novels. I also enjoy reading theological books which are well written, in particular I've found the apologetic work of Timothy Keller astounding. Lee Strobel is also another in a similar vein. C.S.Lewis likewise has some nice quotations however I have not agreed with some of his philosophies. However all that is an aside to this review.

I'm simply pointing out that this type of novel is not one I would be averse to reading. However at the time the structure of the book appeared to me very rigid. It was a chapter by chapter look at the Hobbit and analysing where Christian values were to be found. Now looking back I realise how weird a book like this seems. Sure Tolkien was a Christian and a writer but he did not write his stories to be Christian lessons and I think to take his story as anything other than an enjoyable book is wrong.

To put it this way I don't think anyone should try and draw their theology from a novel. Unless of course they want to create a cult. I simply felt that the author was tapping into The Hobbit to try and get his own views about God across to an audience. Or perhaps he couldn't find any way to write a theological discourse but by attempting to draw some ideas from The Hobbit that likely weren't even deliberately placed there to begin with. To be honest sometimes a book is just a book.